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A Brief History

Saftey
Gathering
Storing
Traditional Uses

Therapeutic Reference
List of Herbs
Acacia
Agrimony
Alfalfa
Allspice
Aloe Vera
Amaranth
Angelica
Anise
Apple
Arnica
Astragalus
Barberry
Barley Grass
Basil
Bay Laurel
Bayberry
Bearberry
Beech
Bergamot
Bilberry
Bistort
Black Cohosh
Black Haw
Blackberry
Blessed Thistle
Bloodroot
Blue Cohosh
Boneset
Borage
Broom
Buckthorn
Burdock
Calendula
Caraway
Cascara Sagrada
Catnip
Cat's Claw
Cayenne
Cedar
Chamomile
Chaparral
Chickweed
Cinnamon
Clover
Cloves
Coltsfoot
Comfrey
Conflower
Cramp Bark
Cranberry
Damiana
Dandelion
Devil's Claw
Dill
Dong Quai
Dragon's Blood
Echinacea
Elder
Elderberry
Elecampane
Eleuthero
Ephedra
Eucalyptus
Evening Primrose
Eyebright
False Unicorn
Fennel
Fenugreek
Feverfew
Flax
Fo Ti
Frankincense
Garlic
Gentian
Ginger
Ginko
Ginseng
Goldenrod
Goldenseal
Gotu Kola
Green Tea
Hawthorn
Hazel
Heather
Henbane
Holly
Hops
Horehound
Horse Chestnut
Horseradish
Horsetail
Hyssop
Iceland Moss
Irish Moss
Ivy
Jasmine
Jojoba
Juniper
Kava Kava
Kelp
Ladys Mantle
Lavender
Lemon Balm
Lemongrass
Licorice
Lobelia
Lovage
Mandrake
Marigold
Marjoram
Marshmallow
Meadowsweet
Milk Thistle
Motherwort
Mugwort
Mullein
Myrrh
Myrtle
Neem
Nettle
Nutmeg
Oak
Oats
Onion
Orange
Oregano
Oregon Grape Root
Orris
Parsley
Passionflower
Patchouli
Pau d' Arco
Pennyroyal
Peony
Peppermint
Periwinkle
Pipsissewa
Plantain
Poppy
Psyllium
Quassia
Queen Anne's Lace
Raspberry
Red Clover
Reishi
Rose
Rosemary
Rue
Safflower
Saffron
Sage
St. John's Wort
Sandalwood
Sarsaparilla
Sassafras
Saw Palmetto
Senna
Sheep Sorrel
Shepherds Purse
Skullcap
Slippery Elm
Solomon's Seal
Spearmint
Spikenard
Squawvine
Stinging Nettle
Sweet Woodruff
Taheebo
Tansy
Tarragon
Tea Tree
Thyme
Turmeric
Uva Ursi
Valerian
Verbena
Vervain
Violet
Vitex
Wahoo
Walnut
Wild Cherry
Wild Yam
Willow
Witch Hazel
Wood Betony
Wormwood
Yarrow
Yellow Dock
Yerba Mate
Yerba Santa
Yohimbe Bark
Yucca Root
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Introduction to herbs

Below you will find a brief overview of herbs and several of their common forms. If you wish to know more about a specific herb, click on any of the links to your left or click here to search our herb pages for specific keywords.

Whole Food Chinese Herbal Formulas

The whole food Chinese herbal formulas that our company uses come from an International herbal manufacturer and distributor to the world, with independent distributors in over 30 countries.

The CEO of the International herbal manufacturer and distributor is a pharmacologist and a master Chinese herbalist from the very ancient tradition of the Chinese Emperors. The CEO's business partner is a western-trained and educated Medical Doctor. Together, they have tirelessly worked to create newer and better products every year that are always ahead of their time, while maintaining the almost unimaginable balanced herbal formula standards set thousands of years ago by Chinese herbal masters. Their incredible dedication to purity, concentration and balance can be readily felt when consuming or using their peerless products for health.

These whole food Chinese herbal formulas have been produced and sold for over 20 years. The International herbal manufacturer and distributor is a billion dollar company at the leading edge of anti-aging nutrition and personal care.

These whole food Chinese herbal formulas are simply unparalleled in their purity, concentration and formulation because of the combination of ages-old wisdom and state-of-the-art manufacturing applied by the founders and current owners.

These whole food Chinese herbal formulas are formulated, developed and manufactured in state of the art facilities, in compliance with the "good manufacturing practices" set by the Food and Drug Administration.

These whole food Chinese herbal formulas do not use preservatives in its herbal products.

These whole food Chinese herbal formulas contain an exclusive combination of ingredients, which are concentrated for potency and effectiveness.

In this modern world of a "pill for everything", people have come to expect instant cures, instant relief. You should note that with chronic illness, even prescription drugs take time to work. The same applies with Chinese herbs. Give them time to work. Support them with a balanced nutritious diet, with exercise, and with proper attention to yourself and your individual needs.

To find out more about the Chinese herbs that our company uses, please fill out our contact form and we will send you more information.

Gathering, Storing, and Using your Herbs

GATHERING

When gathering or harvesting your herbs, first be absolutely sure you know what you are gathering! This is very important when gathering plants from the wild. Be absolutely certain you know what the plant is before you attempt to use it. If you are not sure of a particular plant, or it "looks like" something but could be something else, leave it alone. You would be better off to purchase the herb through a store or mail order. The alternative may leave you dead. If you care about our natural plants, you will prefer to purchase or grow what you need. Today's herbal needs are creating quite a strain on the numbers of medicinal plants in the wild.

Know what part of the plant you need. Some plants are used in their entirety, others only specific parts. When you are gathering plants from the wild, or even your own garden, remember not to take all of a particular species you may find in an area. Leave some to grow and seed and flourish for the next time you need them. Removing all of a group of plants is irresponsible (unless it is from your own herbal garden). Sprinkle around some of their seeds, to help them propagate. Also remember to give them some natural fertilizer. When taking leaves or branches of a plant, leave plenty for the plant to survive. You should offer the same respect to those plants you gather from your own gardens.

The parts of the plant above ground should be harvested in the morning, before the heat of the sun has a chance to wilt them. It is preferable to do so when the dew is still on the plants. Leaves should be harvested before the buds and blooms appear, and flowers should be harvested before the fruits and seeds appear. Bark and roots should be harvested in the early spring, just as the plant is beginning to show its leaf buds, or in the fall. Don't strip bark from around the trunk of the tree, as this will kill it. Instead, strip bark from small patches, or particular limbs, to preserve the plant for later use, and to preserve its life.

STORING

When using an entire plant, it is customary to hang the plant upside down in a dry area free from pests to allow the plant to dry. Make sure your herbs have dried thoroughly before storing them for further use, or you may discover that you have a moldy mess instead of a useful herb. Roots should be carefully washed, scraped, and chopped into small pieces, then laid on an elevated screen for circulation, to be sure they dry uniformly and thoroughly. Bulbs should be tied together and hung up to dry. Individual leaves can be laid out on a raised screen to dry completely.

The dried portions can then be stored according to your needs. Roots are usually ground into powder for use, or left in small chunks for uses in decoctions, tinctures, and syrups. Leaves are usually stored in their entirety, or crumbled for use in teas. The same applies for blossoms. Store your herbs in air-tight containers. The best containers to use are colored dark glass. The herb then does not pick up impurities from plastics, and does not eat through your plastics, as can happen.

Store in a dry, cool area, and keep out of the light. This is the reason for using colored glass. Light can often break down the remains of your gathered herbs, shortening their shelf life and rendering them nearly useless after a short period of time. So if you can only use normal glass, store those containers in a dark pantry or cabinet. If stored properly, the shelf life of dried herbs is approximately one year. Tinctures can be stored for up to five years. Capsules should be used within one year. Once an herb has been ground, it shortens the amount of time the herb is effective. So do pay careful attention to when you have purchased or stored an herb, for maximum effectiveness.

USING HERBS

Teas
The herbs that will be used for herbal teas are generally the cut and sifted form, or the crumbled dried leaves. Herbs should always be prepared in nonmetallic containers. This prevents the herb from picking up impurities in the metals, and prevents the breakdown of the essential oils in the herbs which can occur when they come in contact with metallics. Steep the herbs in a nonmetallic container with water that has just been brought to a boil. This is an infusion and is used for the more delicate herbs to prevent destroying their healing agents.

A decoction is used to extract the healing agents from herbs that are roots and barks. The herbs are simmered in a nonmetallic cooking container for about one hour. Simmer uncovered until the amount of water is reduced by one half. Those herbs that contain important volatile oils should be simmered slowly in a tightly covered pot.

Don't add table sugar to herbal teas. If a sweetener is needed, use pure, unmolested honey. Refined sugars are unhealthy for our digestive systems, and can actually interfere with the effectiveness of many herbs, as well as aggravate several diseases. If you are allergic to honey and other bee products, you can substitute stevia.

Bolus
A bolus is a suppository. It is made by combining powdered herbs with cocoa butter. The two are mixed together until it is the consistency of stiff pie dough. The mixture is then refrigerated to harden and preserve. Roll into strips and cut into pieces about one inch long. Allow them to come to room temperature before use. Boluses are inserted into the rectum for treating hemorrhoids, and into the vagina for treating vaginal infections and irritations, as well as tumors. Boluses are used at night. The cocoa butter will of course melt with your body heat, so take precautions to protect your clothing and bedding. Residues of the bolus should be rinsed away the next morning.

Oils
Oil extracts are made from fresh herbs that contain volatile oils used for healing. Fresh herbs are necessary for the extraction of the oils. The fresh herbs are usually crushed with a mortar and pestle. Olive or sesame oil is then added, at the rate of one pint of oil to every two ounces of herbs. The mixture is allowed to stand in a warm place, out of direct light, for three days. The oils are stored in dark, air-tight, glass containers. Add one to two capsules of Vitamin E to each bottle for preserving the extracted oils. This is a process that is best begun on the new moon.

Syrups
Syrups are used for treating coughs and sore throats, and is an easy way to give herbs to children. Two ounces of herb are added to 4 cups of water in a nonmetallic container, and boiled down slowly and gently until about 2 cups of liquid is left. Strain while it is still warm, and add two ounces of honey and/or glycerine. Lemon juice can also be added for flavor. Store in a dark glass container.

Capsules
Capsules are the best way to take herbs that do not taste good. They are also the best way to take herbs that need to be ingested over a long period of time, or for those of us who don't have time at work to make herbal teas. It is best to purchase finely powdered herbs for this purpose. The small "0" sized capsules are used, or the larger "00". The powdered herbs are blended together, if an herbal combination is desired. Separate the two halves of the capsule, and fill each half. Then carefully put the two halves back together. Take according to the needs of the treatment.

Tinctures
Tinctures are easy to make, and are a very convenient way to make use of the healing herbs in today's fast society. They are made with the more potent herbs that are generally not taken as herbal teas.

Tinctures are made by combining 1 to 4 ounces of a powdered or thoroughly crushed herb with one pint of alcohol. The alcohol most often used is vodka. The amount of liquid should be more than the herbs can absorb, so you may need to add more liquid as the days go by. Shake it daily and allow to stand in a warm place, out of direct light, for two weeks. The liquid is then poured through a cloth, such as layers of cheesecloth. The herbs that remain are squeezed thoroughly to remove as much of the liquid from them as possible. Keep the tincture stored in a dark glass bottle or jar.

Tinctures are used by the drop, or teaspoon. If you want to be sure the alcohol won't affect you, or you are a recovering alcoholic, add the recommended number of tincture drops into a 4 ounce cup of hot water, wait a few moments, and then drink. The alcohol will evaporate. Tinctures can be made of single herbs, or herbal combinations, depending upon your needs.

Liniments
Liniments are made very similar to tinctures. Since these are for external applications only, rubbing alcohol is used in place of the grain alcohol for tinctures. Crush the herbs to be used, then steep for two weeks in 12 to 16 ounces of rubbing alcohol. Herbs that are recommended for easing rheumatism, arthritis, and muscle aches and pains are the ones used in making liniments. Before use, a dropperful of olive or almond oil may be added to a small amount of the mixture, to ease the skin around the affected area as well as the joint or area itself.

Creams
Creams are used to treat skin conditions of all kinds. They can be made by melting petroleum jelly and adding the herbs, although that is rather messy. A better method is to boil approximately 1 cup of the herb(s) to be used in 3 to 4 cups of water, in a non-metallic container, for about 15 minutes for leafy herbs and 30 minutes for root herbs to extract the volatile oils. You can then strain the herbs out, or leave them in if you so desire, depending on the kind of cream you are making. Add 5 ounces of sesame or olive oil to the water remaining and continue to simmer over low heat until all of the water has evaporated. Melt 2 ounces of beeswax, and stir into the oil mixture. TIP: try to have the wax and the oil near the same temperature, and stir vigorously! After the mixture cools a bit, add 2 teaspoons (or 4 to 6 capsules) of Vitamin E oil as a preservative, and mix it in well. Pour into containers and allow to cool completely. Most creams will keep for up to one year.

NOTE: The information contained within the web site is for educational purposes only and is not meant to be a substitute for seeking the advice of a qualified physician and/or naturopathic doctor, and the information given within is not meant to replace modern medicines or established medical treatments without the proper guidance of a qualified health practitioner. It is only meant for educational purposes. AllNatural.net and its representatives make no claims as to the ability of plants and their derivitives to cure you or treat you of any ailment known to man. Before using any plants and their derivitives you should seek the advice and training of a qualified professional and your personal physician. DO seek guidance if you do not know how to use these plants and their derivitives properly. AllNatural.net and its representatives will not be held responsible for the improper ingestion or other improper uses of plants and their derivitives. By use of this web site and the information contained herein you agree to hold harmless AllNatural.Net and its suppliers, heirs, employees and affiliates and you agree to the terms contained within the privacy and site use policy.

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